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Wireshark – HTTP Overview: In this Wireshark lab, you’ll get acquainted with Wireshark, and make some simple packet captures and observations. The basic tool for observing the messages exchanged between executing protocol entities is called a packet sniffer. As the name suggests, a packet sniffer captures (“sniffs”) messages being sent/received from/by your computer; it will also typically store and/or display the contents of the various protocol fields in these captured messages. A packet sniffer itself is passive. It observes messages being sent and received by applications and protocols running on your computer, but never sends packets itself. Similarly, received packets are never explicitly addressed to the packet sniffer. Instead, a packet sniffer receives a copy of packets that are sent/received from/by application and protocols executing on your machine. Summary of tasks: 1. Run Wireshark 2. Capture some HTTP data 3. Submit your results and reflection. What You Will Need The physical machine you used for Lab 1. Running Wireshark When you run the Wireshark program, you’ll get a startup screen, as shown below: Looking at the upper left hand side of the screen – you’ll see an “Interface list”. This is the list of network interfaces on your computer. Once you choose an interface, Wireshark will capture all packets on that interface. In the example above, there is an Ethernet interface (Gigabit network Connection) and a wireless interface (“Microsoft”). If you click on one of these interfaces to start packet capture (i.e., for Wireshark to begin capturing all packets being sent to/from that interface), a screen like the one below will be displayed, showing information about the packets being captured. Once you start packet capture, you can stop it by using the Capture pull down menu and selecting Stop. The Wireshark interface has five major components: • The command menus are standard pulldown menus located at the top of the window. The File menu allows you to save captured packet data or open a file containing previously captured packet data, and exit the Wireshark application. The Capture menu allows you to begin packet capture. Taking Wireshark for a Test Run 1. Start up your favorite web browser on your local machine, which will display your selected homepage. 2. Start up the Wireshark software. Wireshark has not yet begun capturing packets. 3. To begin packet capture, select the Capture pull down menu and select Interfaces. This will cause the “Wireshark: Capture Interfaces” window to be displayed. 4. You’ll see a list of the interfaces on your computer as well as a count of the packets that have been observed on that interface so far. Click on Start for the interface on which you want to begin packet capture (in the case, the Gigabit network Connection). Packet capture will now begin – Wireshark is now capturing all packets being sent/received from/by your computer! 5. Once you begin packet capture, a window will show the packets being captured. By selecting Capture pulldown menu and selecting Stop, you can stop packet capture. But don’t stop packet capture yet. Let’s capture some interesting packets first. To do so, we’ll need to generate some network traffic. Let’s do so using a web browser, which will use the HTTP protocol that we will study in detail in class to download content from a website. 6. While Wireshark is running, enter the URL: http://www.grantham.edu Have that page displayed in your browser. In order to display this page, your browser will contact the HTTP server at www.grantham.edu and exchange HTTP messages with the server in order to download this page. The Ethernet frames containing these HTTP messages (as well as all other frames passing through your Ethernet adapter) will be captured by Wireshark. 7. After your browser has displayed the main html page, stop Wireshark packet capture by selecting stop in the Wireshark capture window. You now have live packet data that contains all protocol messages exchanged between your computer and other network entities! The HTTP message exchanges with the web server should appear somewhere in the listing of packets captured. But there will be many other types of packets displayed as well. Even though the only action you took was to download a web page, there were evidently many other protocols running on your computer that are unseen by the user. 8. Type in “http” (without the quotes, and in lower case – all protocol names are in lower case in Wireshark) into the display filter specification window at the top of the main Wireshark window. Then select Apply (to the right of where you entered “http”). This will cause only HTTP message to be displayed in the packet-listing window. 9. Find the HTTP GET message that was sent from your computer to the eee.grantham.edu HTTP server. (Look for an HTTP GET message in the “listing of captured packets” portion of the Wireshark window that shows “GET” followed by the URL that you entered. When you select the HTTP GET message, the Ethernet frame, IP datagram, TCP segment, and HTTP message header information will be displayed in the packet-header window. By clicking on ‘+’ and ‘-‘ right-pointing and down-pointing arrowheads to the left side of the packet details window, minimize the amount of Frame, Ethernet, Internet Protocol, and Transmission Control Protocol information displayed. Maximize the amount information displayed about the HTTP protocol. 10. Exit Wireshark Congratulations! You’ve now completed the second lab. Capturing the Screen Image 1. Press the PrntScn key to copy whole screen (Showing the Wireshark capture) to the clipboard. Open Paint and paste in the image. Save it as a JPEG, with the filename Your Name CS316 – LAB 2-VM. Reflection 1. What are some of the benefits to using a protocol analyzer? What are some of the risks? Include this in your lab write up. 2. How was your experience with thisl? Did you have any issues? Turning in your Project 1. Include these things with your file: o A lab write up answering the questions in the reflection section. o The image you captured above, as an attachment 2. Submit to the dropbox, save a save for yourself

Wireshark - HTTP
Overview:
In this Wireshark lab, you’ll get acquainted with Wireshark, and make some simple packet captures and observations.
The basic tool for observing the messages exchanged between executing protocol entities is called a packet sniffer.  As the name suggests, a packet sniffer captures (“sniffs”) messages being sent/received from/by your computer; it will also typically store and/or display the contents of the various protocol fields in these captured messages. A packet sniffer itself is passive. It observes messages being sent and received by applications and protocols running on your computer, but never sends packets itself. Similarly, received packets are never explicitly addressed to the packet sniffer.  Instead, a packet sniffer receives a copy of packets that are sent/received from/by application and protocols executing on your machine.
Summary of tasks:
1.	Run Wireshark
2.	Capture some HTTP data
3.	Submit your results and reflection.
What You Will Need
The physical machine you used for Lab 1.
Running Wireshark
When you run the Wireshark program, you’ll get a startup screen, as shown below:
 
Looking at the upper left hand side of the screen – you’ll see an “Interface list”.  This is the list of network interfaces on your computer.  Once you choose an interface, Wireshark will capture all packets on that interface.  In the example above, there is an Ethernet interface (Gigabit network Connection) and a wireless interface (“Microsoft”).
If you click on one of these interfaces to start packet capture (i.e., for Wireshark to begin capturing all packets being sent to/from that interface), a screen like the one below will be displayed, showing information about the packets being captured.  Once you start packet capture, you can stop it by using the Capture pull down menu and selecting Stop.
 
The Wireshark interface has five major components:
•	The command menus are standard pulldown menus located at the top of the window.   The File menu allows you to save captured packet data or open a file containing previously captured packet data, and exit the Wireshark application.  The Capture menu allows you to begin packet capture.
Taking Wireshark for a Test Run
1.	Start up your favorite web browser on your local machine, which will display your selected homepage.
2.	Start up the Wireshark software.  Wireshark has not yet begun capturing packets.
3.	To begin packet capture, select the Capture pull down menu and select Interfaces. This will cause the “Wireshark: Capture Interfaces” window to be displayed. 
 
4.	You’ll see a list of the interfaces on your computer as well as a count of the packets that have been observed on that interface so far.  Click on Start for the interface on which you want to begin packet capture (in the case, the Gigabit network Connection).  Packet capture will now begin - Wireshark is now capturing all packets being sent/received from/by your computer! 
5.	Once you begin packet capture, a window will show the packets being captured.  By selecting Capture pulldown menu and selecting Stop, you can stop packet capture.   But don’t stop packet capture yet.  Let’s capture some interesting packets first.  To do so, we’ll need to generate some network traffic.  Let’s do so using a web browser, which will use the HTTP protocol that we will study in detail in class to download content from a website.
6.	While Wireshark is running, enter the URL: 
http://www.grantham.edu
Have that page displayed in your browser. In order to display this page, your browser will contact the HTTP server at www.grantham.edu and exchange HTTP messages with the server in order to download this page.  The Ethernet frames containing these HTTP messages (as well as all other frames passing through your Ethernet adapter) will be captured by Wireshark.
7.	After your browser has displayed the main html page, stop Wireshark packet capture by selecting stop in the Wireshark capture window.   You now have live packet data that contains all protocol messages exchanged between your computer and other network entities!  The HTTP message exchanges with the web server should appear somewhere in the listing of packets captured.  But there will be many other types of packets displayed as well.  Even though the only action you took was to download a web page, there were evidently many other protocols running on your computer that are unseen by the user. 
8.	Type in “http” (without the quotes, and in lower case – all protocol names are in lower case in Wireshark) into the display filter specification window at the top of the main Wireshark window.  Then select Apply (to the right of where you entered “http”).  This will cause only HTTP message to be displayed in the packet-listing window. 
9.	Find the HTTP GET message that was sent from your computer to the eee.grantham.edu HTTP server. (Look for an HTTP GET message in the “listing of captured packets” portion of the Wireshark window  that shows “GET” followed by the URL that you entered.  When you select the HTTP GET message, the Ethernet frame, IP datagram, TCP segment, and HTTP message header information will be displayed in the packet-header window. By clicking on ‘+’ and ‘-‘ right-pointing and down-pointing arrowheads to the left side of the packet details window, minimize the amount of Frame, Ethernet, Internet Protocol, and Transmission Control Protocol information displayed.  Maximize the amount information displayed about the HTTP protocol. 
10.	Exit Wireshark
Congratulations!  You’ve now completed the second lab.
Capturing the Screen Image
1.	Press the PrntScn key to copy whole screen (Showing the Wireshark capture) to the clipboard.  Open Paint and paste in the image.  Save it as a JPEG, with the filename Your Name CS316 – LAB 2-VM.
Reflection
1.	What are some of the benefits to using a protocol analyzer?  What are some of the risks?  Include this in your lab write up.
2.	How was your experience with thisl? Did you have any issues?
Turning in your Project
1.	Include these things with your file: 
o	A lab write up answering the questions in the reflection section.
o	The image you captured above, as an attachment
2.	Submit to the dropbox, save a save for yourself

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

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