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Information required in order to plan building operations Before planning can begin for any type of contract it is necessary to obtain all relevant information in order that the programme produced ensures the work is carried out according to the client’s requirements. Therefore it will be necessary to ensure that all information is obtained in order that the work can be planned to ensure that it is completed according to specification, and within the time and financial constraints imposed by the client and to ensure the maximum use of available resources to enable the maximum profit to be made by the contractor. A great deal of this information is provided by the client, or their representative, which will be passed to the contractor. Such documents will include: · Existing programmes and plans. The work you have to plan may have to be coordinated with others; this will be particularly relevant if you are acting as a sub-contractor where you may be given a time window in order to carry out the work. · Drawings, specification. In order for the designers of a building to convey their requirements; a set of drawings and specifications are produced which enables the building to be constructed according to the designers original intentions. The planner will need to know this in order to position the building but also to determine what is required and how long each element will take; we will look at that in greater detail later in this unit. · Contract conditions. The contract may contain a number of conditions which you will need to know in order to ensure that the planning is done to take these into consideration: This will certainly include the completion date. · Statutory requirements. You will need to ensure that all statutory requirements have been met, this will include checking that any permissions have been obtained before the commencement of work, i.e. building approval and that any notices regarding the notification of Health and Safety executive have been delivered. · Resource availability. The resources available will need to be known as the amount of labour will determine the time that a task will take. Also the plant and machinery you have will affect the way that the work is carried out and the time it takes. The resources available will either dictate the time scale for the project, or the time scale of the project will dictate the resources that are needed in order to complete by a certain date.

1.1.1 Information required in order to plan building operations

Before planning can begin for any type of contract it is necessary to obtain all relevant information in order that the programme produced ensures the work is carried out according to the client’s requirements. Therefore it will be necessary to ensure that all information is obtained in order that the work can be planned to ensure that it is completed according to specification, and within the time and financial constraints imposed by the client and to ensure the maximum use of available resources to enable the maximum profit to be made by the contractor.

A great deal of this information is provided by the client, or their representative, which will be passed to the contractor. Such documents will include:

· Existing programmes and plans. The work you have to plan may have to be coordinated with others; this will be particularly relevant if you are acting as a sub-contractor where you may be given a time window in order to carry out the work.
· Drawings, specification. In order for the designers of a building to convey their requirements; a set of drawings and specifications are produced which enables the building to be constructed according to the designers original intentions. The planner will need to know this in order to position the building but also to determine what is required and how long each element will take; we will look at that in greater detail later in this unit.
· Contract conditions. The contract may contain a number of conditions which you will need to know in order to ensure that the planning is done to take these into consideration: This will certainly include the completion date.
· Statutory requirements. You will need to ensure that all statutory requirements have been met, this will include checking that any permissions have been obtained before the commencement of work, i.e. building approval and that any notices regarding the notification of Health and Safety executive have been delivered.
· Resource availability. The resources available will need to be known as the amount of labour will determine the time that a task will take. Also the plant and machinery you have will affect the way that the work is carried out and the time it takes. The resources available will either dictate the time scale for the project, or the time scale of the project will dictate the resources that are needed in order to complete by a certain date.
· Management instructions. You may be given specific instruction relating to work generally or to a specific contract. These can relate to any part of the work but may include reference to carrying out the work in a given situation i.e. in the event of soil contamination or in relation to dealing with waste.
· Site conditions. Prior to the start of planning you will need to ensure that you are aware of the site conditions. This will relate to the ground conditions and the potential layout and surrounding area in order to plan the site and how the process will be carried out. When laying out the site it is essential that all aspects are considered so that the maximum use of the site is made. It also needs to restrict inconvenience so that materials do not have to be doubled handled or facilities relocated in order for construction to continue.

1.1.2 Sources of the information and the means of acquiring it

A great deal of information that is needed to plan will come from documents, these can be generic documents in that they apply to all contracts or they can be specific to a particular contract.

Generic Documents

These fall into two categories in that they are either external documents such as Statutory Regulation and Legislation such as Building Regulations and planning requirements to specific requirements relating to a particular area of work i.e. Health and Safety. All documents will be held by your company.

Company Policies

These are produced by the company to ensure that it will conduct its business in a manner which ensures it complies with current legislation. Policies will relate to general requirements relating to staff and work methods. Two examples of company policies are:
Health & Safety

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